Samstag, 13. Oktober 2012

The Ganzfeld Effect

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Using the Ganzfeld effect is a quite cheap way to enter inner realms. 
You cover your eyes with bisected ping pong balls which are illuminated with a red light. If you open your eyes you will see a plain white or red area with no contrasts or patterns (Ganzfeld means whole field in German). You use headphones and listen to a continuous sound like white, pink or brown noise, which drowns out every external sound. After a certain period of time you will get used to this sound. 

This leads to a state of sensory deprivation. If you are deprived from external stimuli your brain enters unusual states. 
Brain levels of Noradrenaline, Endorphines and Dopamine in your brain are increased. 

Due to the lack of external stimuli your brain will start to focus on your inner world and internal pictures will start. Open eye visuals will rise from your unconscious mind within five and thirty minutes.

You may buy ping pong balls in every big supermarket for about $1. Use a sharp knife to halve one and a pair of scissors to optimize the form as you may see
here.
The white noise you may download at www.iso-tones.com or if you prefer other sounds you may create them via Audacity. Or maybe the easiest way: just turn a radio out of tune.
To get a red light shining on the ganzfeld glasses I use a color changing lamp from Ikea. I can switch to different colors in the whole spectrum.

Parapsycholgists use this kind of effect to do research about telepathy. [2],[3].
But I am more interested in the psychonautic effects of this method.

Personal experience:
Open eye visuals differ if you are tired or rested. If I start a ganzfeld experiment tired, I see geometric patterns very quickly which morph into pictures and scenes. If I start rested, this will be delayed but more intense. 

The body sensations impress me as well. Internal feelings of flowing, feeling that head and body are one, feeling one with the ganzfeld. 

I was able to hear music in the white noise. I really liked it.

See also:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ganzfeld_effect 
http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/ideas/graphics/011109_hacking_your_brain/

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